Am I eligible for referral to a specialist?

If you visit your GP (or breast care team) with concerns about your family history, they should go over all the details of the cancers in your family with you. If you meet the criteria for further assessment by a specialist, they should refer you to a family history or genetics clinic if you wish. Both men and women with a family history can be referred, if eligible.

Use our tool below to see whether you might be eligible for referral to a specialist to explore your family history of breast cancer.

question 2
Enter your family's history of breast and ovarian cancer below (including any cancers you have had yourself) to find out whether you meet the criteria for referral to a specialist. Please enter information for blood relatives only.

Please provide the most accurate information you can about your family, so we can provide the best advice for you. However, select "unsure" if there are any details you are not certain of.


You will have the option to print out the information you enter for future reference.
No relatives
question 3
Have any of your first or second degree relatives had:

Sarcoma diagnosed below the age of 45
Glioma
Adrenal cortical carcinoma as a child
Does your family have any Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry?
Has more than one of your first or second degree relatives had cancer at a young age?
As one or more of your blood relatives has been confirmed to carry a faulty breast cancer gene, you should be eligible for further information, care and support from a specialist genetics clinic. If you are not currently in contact with a genetics clinic and would like to be, ask your GP to refer you. Alternatively, if you know the details of your relative's genetics clinic, you may be able to contact them directly to ask about the process for how you can be referred.

Disclaimer: This tool is intended to be a rough guide and is only as accurate as the information you provide. Anyone with concerns about their family history of breast cancer should speak with their GP (or breast care team).
Related information
What happens when you visit a family history or genetic clinic?
Read more
Genetics testing may identify whether you have inherited a faulty gene that runs in your family.
Read more
Get advice on having discussions with relatives about your family's history of cancer
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Based on the information you've provided, you are likely to be eligible for referral to a specialist at a family history clinic or genetics clinic to have your risk of breast cancer assessed. If you want to look into this further, please visit your GP (or breast care team if you are currently receiving treatment for breast cancer). They can refer you to specialist services if they feel your family history suggests you're at increased risk of breast cancer.


Your referral will be based on the information you give your doctor, so remember to keep them updated if any new cancers occur in your family.

Disclaimer: This tool is intended to be a rough guide and is only as accurate as the answers you provide. Anyone with concerns about their family history of breast cancer should speak with their GP (or breast care team).
Related information
What happens when you visit a family history or genetic clinic?
Read more
Download a factsheet on the information your GP (or breast care team) will ask you for if you go to discuss your family history
Download PDF
Get advice on having discussions with relatives about your family's history of cancer
Read more
Based on the information you've provided, you might be eligible for referral to a specialist at a family history clinic or genetics clinic to have your risk of breast cancer assessed. If you want to look into this further, please visit your GP (or breast care team if you are currently receiving treatment for breast cancer). Your doctor may need to seek advice before they can decide whether or not your family history requires further assessment.


Your referral will be based on the information you give your doctor, so remember to keep them updated if any new cancers occur in your family.

Disclaimer: This tool is intended to be a rough guide and is only as accurate as the answers you provide. Anyone with concerns about their family history of breast cancer should speak with their GP (or breast care team).
Related information
Download a factsheet on the information your GP (or breast care team) will ask you for if you go to discuss your family history
Download PDF
What happens when you visit a family history or genetic clinic?
Read more
Get advice on having discussions with relatives about your family's history of cancer
Read more
Based on the information you've provided, it's not clear whether or not you are likely to be eligible for referral to a specialist at a family history clinic or genetics clinic to have your risk of breast cancer assessed. If you want to look into this further, please visit your GP (or breast care team if you are currently receiving treatment for breast cancer). If you're able to find out more information about the cancers in your family, this will help your doctor decide whether your family history needs looking into further.


Your referral will be based on the information you give your doctor, so remember to keep them updated if any new cancers occur in your family.

If you have very little information about your blood relatives (e.g. because you're adopted), this will make it difficult for your doctor to assess your breast cancer risk, although you are still able to seek their advice if you have concerns about breast cancer.

Disclaimer: This tool is intended to be a rough guide and is only as accurate as the answers you provide. Anyone with concerns about their family history of breast cancer should speak with their GP (or breast care team).
Related information
Download a factsheet on the information your GP (or breast care team) will ask you for if you go to discuss your family history
Download PDF
Get advice on having discussions with relatives about your family's history of cancer
Read more
Based on the information you have provided, you are probably not eligible for referral to a specialist at a family history clinic or genetics clinic to have your risk of breast cancer assessed. This is because your family history does not appear to be strong enough to suggest you are at increased risk of breast cancer.

Breast cancer is a common disease and can occur in families by chance. For example, having one relative who was diagnosed over the age of 40 would not usually indicate that you are at higher than average risk of developing breast cancer.

However, if you're still concerned about cancers in your family, visit your GP to discuss this.


Your assessment will be based on the information you give your doctor, so remember to keep them updated if any new cancers occur in your family.

Disclaimer: This tool is intended to be a rough guide and is only as accurate as the answers you provide. Anyone with concerns about their family history of breast cancer should speak with their GP (or breast care team).
Related information
Download a factsheet on the information your GP (or breast care team) will ask you for if you go to discuss your family history
Download PDF
Get advice on having discussions with relatives about your family's history of cancer
Read more

Please note that we do not store your answers, or track them in any way.

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